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20131028
20131105
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the risk of concussions and how parents should weigh the tradeoffs. jeffrey brown has the story. >> brown: the n.f.l. is already playing under a new spotlight on concussions. days before the season began, the league agreed to a $765 million settlement with 4,500 former players. they'd charged that owners concealed information on the effects of repeated head injuries. that history was the focus of a pbs "frontline" investigation that aired earlier this month on the links between head injuries and brain disease. now, a new study explores the risks for athletes well before they reach their college and professional years. the report by the institute of medicine-- a non-profit, independent organization-- focuses on sports-related concussions in youth, from elementary school through adolescence. one member of the panel, dr. frederick rivara-- of the university of washington school of medicine-- pointed to a key problem: the lack of data for this age group. >> there's essentially nothing known about concussions in elementary school and middle aged kids. and that's really why there's a need for m
qualifies for bankruptcy protection. jeffrey brown gets the latest. >> brown: the day started with testimony from kevyn orr, the city's emergency manager. then for three hours, michigan governor rick snyder, who appointed orr, took the stand. it's the first time in modern state history a governor testified in court, and he faced a series of questions from the unions and retirees about whether the state and the city really did all they could do to avoid moving into bankruptcy. christy mcdonald of detroit public television was in the courtroom today, and joins me now. welcome to you. but first remind us briefly the issue in this trial is whether the city can go ahead with its bankruptcy process, right? >> right. it has to prove that it's insolvent and that's what they are seek for bankruptcy protection right now. but what the opposition wants to know is did detroit actually negotiate in good faith before they filed for bankruptcy. >> brown: all right, so today you heard from governor rick snyder, what were the lawyers opposing him arguing and what was his response? >> well, jeffrey, it was far
at the plain speech and droll wit of one of the country's foremost poets. jeffrey brown has our book conversation. the. >> brown: the trouble of poetry is that it encourages the writing of more poetry, more guppys crowding the fish tank. lines from billy collins, former poet laureate and one of the nation's best known poets. his new collection is titled "aimless love: new and selected poems "from his work of the last decade. welcome to you. >> thank you very much, jeff. >> brown: i thought i would sfrel a blur northbound this book. alice fulton writes "billy collins put the fun back in profundity." are you consciously aiming for fun? are you constantly aiming for pro fund any what are you doing? >> well, there's a lot of unconscious activity that goes on in the composition of a poem so i can't -- i can't picture myself starting out aiming to do anything, having much of an agenda. i think in writing a poem i'm making some tonal adjustments and it took me a long time to allow anything like fun into my poetry. >> brown: it did? >> well, i thought originally when i was in school and i wa
. the sox beat the st. louis cardinals last night, to take the title in six games. jeffrey brown will have more on the red sox's victory later in the program. also ahead on the "newshour": outrage over the n.s.a. tapping into servers for google and yahoo, plus spying on asia; dismantling syria's chemical weapons program; the recent wave of violence in iraq; senator susan collins on the future of the republican party and abraham lincoln's foreign policy. >> ifill: newly published information leaked by former nsa contractor edward snowden is reinforcing the notion that u.s. spying spreads wide and goes deep. the latest bombshell, partly denied by the obama administration, appears in the "washington post." it says u.s. intelligence agencies have gained access to hundreds of millions of google and yahoo user accounts by secretly tapping into company data centers. late today, six top tech companies-- yahoo, google, aol, apple, microsoft and facebook-- sent a letter to congress, calling for enhanced privacy protections. barton gellman broke the story for "the washington post." welcome, bart gell
, but by far less: $4 billion over ten years. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown takes a closer look at the immediate impact of these changes and what may lie ahead. >> brown: we explore some of the changes on the table with ellen teller of the food research and action center, a not-for-profit that works with hundreds of groups around the country to eradicate hunger. and robert rector is with the heritage foundation. his work on this is considered influential with republican members in congress. welcome to both of you. ellen teller, this immediate action, cutting back assistance, allowing what was considered a temporary increase to lapse, you don't think this is a good idea? >> no, i don't. initially when congress was drafting the recovery act they put in place this boost in snap or food stamp allotments and it was never intended to affect a family by seeing a reduction from one month to the next but because of congressional interference today we are seeing a cliff so a family going in for grocery store today will see every snap household will see a reduction in their monthly benefits lower than what
got the gang together: maple brown sugar, strawberry, blueberry. yeah, a little family reunion. strawberry, your whole grains are showing. ooops! [ female announcer ] try frosted mini-wheats hot or cold. in 8 delicious flavors. [ female announcer ] try frosted mini-wheats hot or cold. imany cold medicines may raisee your blood pressure. that's why there's coricidin hbp it relieves cold symptoms without raising blood pressure. so look for powerful cold medicine with a heart. coricidin hbp. >>> our "instant index" starts with that unforgettable voice taking the world by storm tonight. you heard it before the break. look at this tonight. she's 9 years old. when she steps on stage, this is what happens. ♪ >> the judges in disbelief, the rest of us today. her performance now viewed 2 million times. she's self-taught. >>> it's halloween and who doesn't love a scary movie. which is the scariest of all. they monitored heart rates as we watched scary movies. the top three, nightmare on elm street, the exorcist and the number one scariest movie, the shining, the number one scene that g
charges against the firm. jeffrey brown takes a deeper look at the violations in question and what the case may suggest about the government's broader investigations into wall street practices. >> brown: steven cohen is not just any trader. he was one of the street's best known traders. and his firm was one of the more successful, with a record of returning 25% a year to investors. sheelah kolhatkar, a national correspondent at bloomberg businessweek has been chronicling this case and the world of hedge funds. she was at the press conference today and joins me now. both steve cohen were engaging in wrongdoing didn't have the evidence they needed. settlement of the charges against the company does not create any sort of immunity for cohen himself or any individuax3 and i think the u.s. attorney, he might have mentioned that four different times during a 40 minute press conference. so they are still looking into him. there is also a civil case with the sec which also could carry a significant bite. the sec is looking to bar stephen cohen from the securities industry for life. this is
stunning pictures being taken too. glimpses into what we see and share with each other. joe brown, technology editor at "wired," amateur photographer, professional critic, knows exactly how best to capture that moment. >> people are getting better, which is nice because my facebook feed doesn't look so terrible anymore. >> reporter: the most common mistake? >> using the flash. like, if you want to make your subject look like a vampire, by all means, shine a giant, ultra white light in their face. >> reporter: also, use those lines. turn on that grid you didn't even know was there. straighten things up. >> nothing kills a photograph more than it being crooked. >> reporter: and be mindful of composition. use those gridlines to place your subjects along its intersections. professionals call it the rule of thirds. and finally, be alive to the moments around you. freeze some beauty. capture what used to be gone in an instant, but now lingers, alive, in photographer nation. and the 4.4 trillion photographs that now exist to tell your story. john donvan, abc news, new york. >> thank to j
a divorce as well. researchers at brown university found that even friends of friends breaking up can pave the way to the divorce court. in other words, divorce is socially contagious. >> if there was a vaccine, it would feel like a sharp stick in the eye. >> at number four, how long will you be married? take a look at your face, facebook. facebook social scientist. yeah, there is a thing such as facebook social scientist. you can tell how long a couple will stay together based on the number of friend they have. >> my wife and i talked about it and we share. >> those who list themselves as married or in a relationship and studied their friends list, the more mutual friend, the longer the relationship will last. the logic, people who introduce their partners to more of their friends usually stay together. at number five, turns out 4g may stand for ga ga goo goo. new research shows more than a third of kids from age 2 are using a smart phone or tablet. yeah, you heard that right. under two. >> just a man and his thoughts. and smart phone. >> according to common sense media, those little kids
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)